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In nature, herbicide resistance could confer advantages to plants.

Credit to Xiao Yang
The most common method for genetic modification of crops to make them herbicide resistant is found to confer advantages to weedy varieties rice, even when herbicide isn’t present. The finding suggests that the benefits of this modification have the potential to extend beyond farms and out into the wild.

There are many kinds of plants have been genetically altered to resist the glyphosate. Roundup was the first herbicide to be marketed. This resistance to glyphosate enables farmers to get rid of weeds without causing any damage to their crop.

Glyphosate can inhibit plant growth by blocking EPSP synase which is an enzyme involved in the creation of amino acids as well as other chemicals which comprise around 35% of the plant’s mass. ラウンドアップ Genetic modification, which is used by Monsanto’s Roundup Ready crops, which are based in St Louis (Missouri), typically involves inserting genes in the DNA of the crop to increase EPSP synthase production. https://chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/search/?rkf=1&ei=UTF-8&p=%E3%83%A9%E3%82%A6%E3%83%B3%E3%83%89%E3%82%A2%E3%83%83%E3%83%97&fr=sc_dr&__ysp=44Op44Km44Oz44OJ44Ki44OD44OX The genes are often derived from bacteria that has affected the plants.

The plant can withstand the effects glyphosate thanks to the additional EPSP synthase. Biotechnology labs attempted to utilize plants’ genes to increase EPSP synthase activity. ラウンドアップ 蓋 This was partially to exploit a loophole within US law that permits regulatory approval of organisms containing transgenes that have not been derived from pests caused by bacteria.

https://www.amazon.co.jp/%E6%97%A5%E7%94%A3%E5%8C%96%E5%AD%A6-%E9%99%A4%E8%8D%89%E5%89%A4-%E5%8E%9F%E6%B6%B2%E3%82%BF%E3%82%A4%E3%83%97-%E3%83%A9%E3%82%A6%E3%83%B3%E3%83%89%E3%82%A2%E3%83%83%E3%83%97%E3%83%9E%E3%83%83%E3%82%AF%E3%82%B9%E3%83%AD%E3%83%BC%E3%83%89-500%EF%BD%8D%EF%BD%8C/dp/B001GH6XVQ There aren’t many studies that have examined whether transgeneslike those that confer resistance to glyphosate, can increase the resilience of plants to surviving and reproduce once they cross-pollinate with wild or weedy species. ラウンドアップ Norman Ellstrand is a University of California Riverside plant geneticist. “The assumption is that any kind of transgene will cause disadvantage in the wild, in absence of select pressure, since it could reduce fitness,” Ellstrand said.

Lu Baorong, an ecologist from Fudan University in Shanghai has rewritten that view. He discovered that glyphosate resistance gives significant fitness benefits to the weedy variant of the standard rice plant Oryza Sativa.

Their study was published in 1. Lu and his collaborators genetically modified cultivated rice to enhance its EPSP synthase expression and crossed it with a weedy cousin.

The group then let offspring to crossbreed with one another, resulting in second generation hybrids that are genetically similar to their parents with the exception for how many copies of the gene that encodes EPSP synthase. As expected, the hybrids that had more copies of the gene were more likely to make more tryptophan and have greater levels of enzymes than their unmodified counterparts.

Researchers also found that transgenic plants were more photosynthesis-intensive as well as produced more flowers and produced 48-125% fewer seeds per plant than non-transgenic hybrids. ラウンドアップ This was despite the fact that glyphosate was never present.

Lu believes that making the rice weedy less competitive could make it more difficult for farmers who have their land invaded by pests.

“If the EPSP-synthase gene is introduced into the wild rice species their genetic diversity, which is vital to preserve is at risk because the transgene’s genotype could outcompete natural species” Brian Ford-Lloyd who is a plant geneticist at the University of Birmingham, UK. This is among the most evident examples of plausible harmful effects [of GM crop on the environment.”

The public believes that genetically modified plants that have more copies of their own genes than those from microorganisms are more safe. This belief is also challenged by the study. Lu declares, “Our study shows this is not necessarily true.”

According to some researchers this research suggests that the future regulation of genetically engineered plants should be rethought. Ellstrand believes that some believe that biosafety regulations could be relaxed given the past two decades of genetic engineering. The study found that any new products should be evaluated carefully.